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VZ Grips who has long been an industry leader in manufacturing Micarta and G10, and Carbon Fiber pistol grips for some of the worlds most popular pistols recently announced they are bringing their technology and skills to the AR-15 market. The announcement from VZ Grips initially was rather vague on what textures and colors would be in the initial offering, but one thing that is known for sure is that there will be twenty different variants of their AR-15 grips in the very near future. This move by VZ Grips seems to be a logical step in the companies gradual entrance into the AR-15 and rifle market.

VZ Introduces New AR-15 Grips

VZ Introduces New AR-15 GripsVZ Grips who has long been an industry leader in manufacturing Micarta and G10, and Carbon Fiber pistol grips for some of the worlds most popular pistols recently announced they are bringing their technology and skills to the AR-15 market. The announcement from VZ Grips initially was rather vague on what textures and colors would be in the initial offering, but one thing that is known for sure is that there will be twenty different variants of their AR-15 grips in the very near future. This move by VZ Grips seems to be a logical step in the companies gradual entrance into the AR-15 and rifle market. Recently they started to produce several types of textured rail covers for both M-Lok and KeyMod style fore rails. The recent news was also followed by a list of the texture patterns that VZ intends to release this initial batch of AR-15 grips in, the patterns are as follows. Alien G10 Diamond Slant G10 Frag G10 Operator II G10 Recon G10 VZ Grips is releasing these grips three days earlier than projected for people who have signed up on the companies web page. While these grips might not appeal to all AR-15 owners for a variety of reasons including their projected cost of $95, there is no denying that VZ Grips makes a fantastic product. I have used VZ Grips on several pistols over the years including my daily conceal carry sidearm and will say if these grips are anything like their other grips, they will be well worth the money you spend on them. Image Courtesy: TheFirearmsBlog.com We hope you enjoyed this quick look at a brand new offering from VZ Grips. We have reached out to the company in the hopes of being able to perform some sort of test and evaluation process on them. As of the time of this article they haven’t returned our emails or phone calls. We here at the site are hoping that VZ Grips also has plans for AK-47 grips as well, we can always hope. Rick Feature Image Courtesy:thefirearmsblog.com

The Firearm and the Martial Artist

The Firearm and the Martial Artist

Many years ago I was involved in a School of Kung Fu in Texas. My little town was fortunate to actually have high quality martial arts instruction. At the time I also enjoyed firearms. I found out real quick that firearms were a touchy subject around my classmates. There was a massive disconnect between me and everyone else. The majority of students hated guns. The hate was largely a philosophical issue. The hate was directed towards the technology that could decimate them in spite of years of grueling physical conditioning. I get it. I can understand their grudge against guns. Years of hard training could be destroyed by a five-pound trigger pull from a thug who catches you off guard. That’s a hard pill to swallow . Kung Fu: Acquired Skill. A wording which encompasses the dedication to master an art, commonly applied to the martial arts. Martial artists who don’t dabble in modern weapons are putting themselves in an odd place. They prepare themselves for combat yet hold prejudice against the tools of truly modern martial arts. Perhaps that’s partly our fault too. The majority of the gun owning American community don’t train for more than a static target range. Punching holes in paper is the depth of most gun owners commitment to mastering their weapon. Boards… don’t hit back –  Bruce Lee There is where the disconnect lies. Martial artists don’t view the majority of American gun owners as disciples of their weapon. They view the gun owner as someone who lacks the discipline to achieve what a dedicated martial artist works so hard for. Yet, having one look at the skill of someone like Jerry Miculek and any warrior of any bygone era would realize that he has reached a level of Kung-Fu with his weapon that commands a deep respect. The training and commitment of a master pistol shooter or a dedicated rifleman leaves no doubt in my mind that we have true martial artists among our gun community. So many more can be unleashed. Introducing a fellow gun owner to the next level of training or competition opens many mental doors for them. Opening their eyes to the capabilities of the weapon in their hands will allow them to see the cutting edge that firearm really is. Martial artists and gun owners could learn a whole lot from each other. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Free Guns, Gear and Ammo from Honor Defense, StealthGearUSA and Team Never Quit

Free Guns, Gear and Ammo from Honor Defense, StealthGearUSA and Team Never Quit

Honor Defense, maker of the best American-made single-stack 9 mm pistols, is teaming up with StealthGearUSA for a consumer giveaway event to be held by Concealed Nation, featuring pistols, holsters and even ammunition. Through the event, the companies will be giving away two Honor Defense ( www.honordefense.com ) Honor Guard 9 mm pistols, three StealthGearUSA ( stealthgearusa.com ) holsters, two StealthGearUSA mag carriers and 900 rounds of Team Never Quit ammunition ( teamneverquit.com ). Five winners will be chosen by random to receive: 1st: Honor Guard pistol, StealthGearUSA OWB holster, mag carrier and belt, and 500 rounds of "Team Never Quit" 9 mm ammunition. 2nd: Honor Guard pistol, StealthGearUSA IWB holster and mag carrier, and 250 rounds of 9 mm ammunition 3rd: StealthGearUSA appendix carry holster and 100 rounds of Team Never Quit ammunition. 4th : 100 rounds of 9 mm Team Never Quit ammunition. 5th: 50 rounds of 9 mm Team Never Quit ammunition. StealthGearUSA, headquartered in American Fork, Utah, is a premium performance brand that is dedicated to the design and manufacture of quality gear meant to work in the real world, to do a difficult job, and to do it with consistent excellence. StealthGearUSA is also the leader in patented, demonstrably superior, differentiated technology platforms for holsters, accessories and support items. Concealed Nation ( concealednation.org ) has grown to one of the largest concealed carry website in the world. Their primary focus of promoting responsible concealed carry has helped many on their journey to successfully implementing the carrying of firearms into their daily lives. Find out more about the Honor Defense/StealthGearUSA/ Concealed Nation giveaway and enter the contest at http://concealednation.org/ 2017/04/2017contest/ . Honor Defense firearms represent the next generation of modular handguns. Honor Defense firearms have more features than any other sub-compact pistol. Every part is manufactured in the U.S.A. to our highest standards. You can’t buy a better pistol right out of the box. To create their pistols, Honor Defense secured input from a panel of professionals that have defended our nation or have extensive credentials in self-defense training. For more information, please visit HONORDEFENSE.COM GET CONNECTED

6 Long Guns To Know From The Spanish-American War

6 Long Guns To Know From The Spanish-American War

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f377dff21c34_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f377dff21c34_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Spanish-American War was among our country's briefest conflicts, yet it marked the introduction of a number of important advancements when it comes to firearms designs. What were the long guns that stormed the Cuban beaches and charged San Juan Hill? Springfield Model 1892 & 1896 Krag–Jørgensen Springfield Model 1873 Model 1895 Lee Navy Spanish M1893 Colt/Browning Model 1895 Machine Gun Gatling Gun The Spanish-American War was among the shortest conflicts America has fought. But despite its brevity, it was weighty, and not only in determining the United States' place in the world. But also, because it marked the introduction of a number of new firearms concepts and technologies, many of which form the bedrock of today’s guns. The conflict saw the American military’s first widespread use of smokeless powder. It was among the country’s first conflicts in which it utilized the modern machine gun. And it, on the Spanish side, featured gun designs that still to this day define modern rifles. So gird your loins and get set to charge like a Rough Rider into the six long guns (and a couple machine guns) you need to know from the Spanish-American War. "Springfield Model 1892" & 1896 Krag–Jørgensen Photo: Hmaag In perfect 20/20 historical hindsight, the Krag–Jørgensen might seem like a lemon. After all, the U.S. Army was quick to replace it after the Spanish and Philippine wars with the iconic Springfield M1903 . But this view is a bit of a bum wrap. The Krag–Jørgensen beat out a slew of other designs to become the Army’s service rifle in the early 1890s. And it was the first truly modern rifle — by today’s definition — the branch adopted. Consider, it was the first U.S. Army service rifle to fire small-caliber smokeless cartridges, the first to utilize a bolt-action, and the first rifle widely used to feed off a magazine. And by all accounts, the U.S. variants used in the Spanish-American War — mainly the Springfield Model 1892 and 1896, but there were some 1898s — performed admirably. They were the backbone of the Yankees thoroughly blackening a European empire’s eye in the span of weeks. Where the Norwegian-designed rifle comes up wanting is in comparison to the service rifle it was up against — the Spanish M1893, better known as the Spanish Mauser. The American’s .30-caliber had two main deficiencies compared to the M1893. Its unique horizontally accessed magazine could not utilize stripper clips, reducing its rate of fire. And the Krag–Jørgensen had a much weaker action, with a single locking lug, and thus fired the much weaker .30-40 Krag. Despite these shortcomings, the Krag–Jørgensen rifles and carbines still left their marks. And they truly helped usher in the modern era of American military power. Related GunDigest Articles 8 Long Guns You Have to Know from the American Civil War Five Guns You Need To Know From The American Revolution Six All-American Bolt-Action Rifles You Need To Own "Springfield Model 1873" Photo: Rock Island Auction Company The venerable “Trapdoor Springfield” had served the U.S. Military well in the Plains Wars and beyond, but was well past its prime by the time America sailed for Cuba. Nonetheless, the single-shot rifles still found their way into U.S. soldiers' hands. It was a matter of necessity, given there were not enough Krag–Jørgensens to go around, yet ample Trapdoors — from the original Model 1873 clear through to the Model 1888. Typically, volunteer units ended up armed with the antiquated rifles, with a notable exception — the 1st United States Volunteer Cavalry, also know as the Rough Riders. Most likely, the second in command of the unit — Theodore Roosevelt — had the political clout to ensure his men were armed with the modern Krag–Jørgensen bolt-actions. The Model 1873 in all its iterations packed a punch and a half, firing the massive .45-70 Government round. Given it was a favorite of Buffalo hunters, it was more than enough to handle man-sized targets. Aside from an abysmal rate of fire for its time, the prairie cannon had one other huge chink in its armor — it was a black powder rifle. In turn, every shot gave a soldier’s position away, due to a large puff of smoke emitted from the muzzle. Little more was needed for the Spanish troops to rain hell down upon a soldier armed with a Trapdoor. Model 1895 Lee Navy Photo: Antique Military Rifles The Krag–Jørgensen may have been the U.S. Army’s first small-bore rifle, but it was not the first one adopted by America’s Armed Services. That distinction goes to this 6mm gem from Winchester. Designed by James Paris Lee — of Lee-Metford and Lee-Enfield fame — the Model 1895 Lee Navy is easily the Spanish-American War’s most unique rifle. What makes it so special is its action, which at first blush appears to be a straight pull, but is actually a camming action. This single feature made the 1895 Lee Navy a lightning-fast rifle to operate, though it did take some drilling to master the mechanism to its full extent. The rifle’s cartridge, the 6mm Lee Navy, was the smallest caliber used by the U.S. Military until the adoption of the 5.56 NATO. And it produced some pretty impressive velocities for the era, capable of pushing a 112-grain bullet more than 2,500 fps. The U.S. Marines put this ballistic potential to good use in the battles of Camp McCalla and Cuzco Well, in some cases engaging Spanish troops 1,200 yards out. The 1895 Lee Navy saw extensive use in the Pacific during the conflict, and again in the Philippine-American War.

Reloading Ammo: An Abbreviated Look at Reloading Short Magnums

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d84c86f4_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d84c86f4_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The venerable .308 Winchester, the king of short cartridges. Photo Massaro Media Group Ever since the .308 came out, shorter cartridges have been all the rage. But short-action rounds present reloaders with a unique set of challenges in getting the most out of the cartridges. Here's a primer on reloading short magnums. The trend to make cartridges shorter has been with us since the 1940s, with the .308 Winchester being developed to replace the .30-06 Springfield. The .308 case spawned an entire family of cartridges, from 6mm in diameter all the way up to .358. It wasn’t long before the Remington folks developed a line of short-action magnums, namely the .350 Remington Magnum and 6.5mm Remington Magnum. They didn’t exactly set the world on fire, but when Winchester announced the WSM, or Winchester Short Magnum, line of cartridges, the game was changed, and the short-action rifles had true magnum capabilities. To the handloader, they can deliver a whole lot of power in a tiny package, but they come with their own set of unique challenges. Let’s talk about some tips for loading for the volumetrically challenged. Related GunDigest Articles Reloading Ammo: Pitfalls of Using Old Pistol Reloading Data Reloading Ammo: Ponderations on Progressive Presses Reloading Ammo: The Precise Business of Reloading AR Cartridges Starting with the .308 family of cases, you shouldn’t really encounter a case capacity problem until you hit the .308 itself. It’s not really a problem, as much as it is a challenge to find a recipe that will deliver velocities that approach the factory standard, especially with the bullets on the heavier end of the spectrum. Look to some of the ball powders; Hodgdon ’s H380 and Winchester 748 come to mind quickly. They will fit better in the compact case, and help to avoid the compressed loads that can become a pain in the arse. The .338 Federal amplifies the problem and the .358 Winchester, although not nearly as popular as it once was, suffers the same fate. The longer spitzers that the bigger cases in these calibers drive so well will drastically compromise the capacity of these cases. For instance, using a medium length bullet in .338, say the 210 grain Swift Scirocco II, you’ll have to compress the load to 115 percent of case capacity with certain powders to achieve respectable velocities. This will not do. Look instead to the bullets that are flat based and of semi-spitzer ogive; they keep their weight forward and take up less room in the case. I like the lighter Swift A-Frame and the North Fork semi-spitzer for these cases, as their bonded core design will prevent premature bullet breakup.

Handgun Hunting for Whitetails?

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379cee4ac07_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379cee4ac07_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Is handgun hunting for whitetails a viable option? You bet! In fact — from revolvers to autoloaders — many handgun hunting options exist for deer hunters. Years ago, I was one of the loudest proponents for big-game handgun hunting in Washington State, and when we finally got the Game Commission to approve it, I quickly focused on a single-action Ruger Blackhawk chambered for the .41 Mag. cartridge, with a 6 ½-inch barrel. I still carry a .41 Mag. Blackhawk (this one with a 4⅝-inch barrel) during deer season, and occasionally when I’m hunting grouse where there might be an encounter with a black bear. The 6½-incher is in my gun safe. I couldn’t sell it. I’ve killed two deer with it. 
Still, perhaps the most popular handgun round for deer is the .44 Mag. And with a heavier bullet, the .357 Mag. has plenty of punch for deer-sized game. I prefer the 125-grain JHP in the .357 Mag. because it is accurate and because it will penetrate deep into the vitals of a deer. Of course, there are lots of other handgun cartridges around. Rifle-class cartridges fired from single-shot handguns such as the Thompson-Center Contender and big-bores (including the .460 and .500 Smith & Wesson, .454 Casull and .480 Ruger) are extremely deadly, but the .44 Mag. is about all the horsepower many people can handle. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! I prefer the .41 Mag. for several reasons; not the least of which was a tale by the late Elmer Keith about a trek he took to Alaska with a pair of the first Smith & Wessons chambered for the .41 Mag. He shot caribou with the guns. Related GunDigest Articles Choosing the Right Hunting Revolver New Handgun: Kimber's Super Jägare Video: Going Big with the Glock 20 About 20 years ago, the hot talk shifted at least momentarily to the 10mm Auto, a round that was reputed to be the semi-auto equal to the .41 Mag. As it turned out, the 10mm Auto is more in the realm of the .357 Mag. Admittedly, the cartridge intrigued me because it was a true .40-caliber with a lot of muscle, and it appeared on the scene with the ill-fated Bren Ten. Even being carried by the Sonny Crockett character on “Miami Vice” couldn’t save the pistol, but the cartridge has remained. Glock 10mm for Deer Hunting Colt chambered its Delta Elite for the round — and there have been other pistols — but the one that seems to be at the top of the heap currently is the Glock Model 20. As it happens, my hunting pal Brian Lull — who took delivery of a stainless Ruger Super Blackhawk in .44 Mag. earlier this year — owns a 10mm Glock, and it’s a real shooter. The Glock platform does not do well in my hand and one of the first things a devoted handgunner has to realize is that he/she will not be able to master all handguns. I call it poor fit because Lull is an excellent shot with that autoloader while I consistently shoot low with it. If you can shoot it, the Glock is a great gun. At close range, the 10mm full-house load with a 200-grain bullet is a whitetail killer with an average velocity of 1,069 fps. The 180-grain option will leave no deer laughing in the woods, either.

Summary

VZ Grips who has long been an industry leader in manufacturing Micarta and G10, and Carbon Fiber pistol grips for some of the worlds most popular pistols recently announced they are bringing their technology and skills to the AR-15 market. The announcement from VZ Grips initially was rather vague on what textures and colors would be in the initial offering, but one thing that is known for sure is that there will be twenty different variants of their AR-15 grips in the very near future. This move by VZ Grips seems to be a logical step in the companies gradual entrance into the AR-15 and rifle market.